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Examining the test-retest reliability of the multiple single-leg hop-stabilization test and the relationship with leg dominance, age, and training [Abstract]

Sawle, Leanne, Freeman, J., Marsden, J. and Matthews, J. 2014. Examining the test-retest reliability of the multiple single-leg hop-stabilization test and the relationship with leg dominance, age, and training [Abstract]. Journal of Athletic Training 49 (5) , e1. 10.4085/1062-6050-49.5.01

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Abstract

Introduction: Within sports medicine, assessing an athlete’s balance is an important part of clinical examination; however, there is no gold standard measure. The multiple single-leg hop-stabilisation test (MSLHST) is a functional test comprised of static and dynamic components, whereby athletes jump to and from 10 marks, maintaining balance for 5 seconds after landing. It may offer a way of assessing athletic balance, but to be used clinically and in research for longitudinal monitoring it needs to show adequate test-retest reliability. This study examined test-retest reliability and investigated possible performance indicators. Methods: Fifteen healthy, active participants were recruited from university staff, students, and local athletes (age ¼ 32.8 6 9.2 years, height ¼ 174.2 6 9.5 cm, weight ¼ 71.4 6 7.5 kg). Testing was undertaken in a university movement laboratory. Participants were tested twice with a 10-minute break between tests. Outcome measures were the MSLHST score on the dominant and nondominant legs. Results were analysed using an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 2,1) and Bland-Altman plots. Regression analysis explored the relationship between MSLHST scores and the effects of age and training. Analyses were performed with a ¼ 0.05. Results: ICCs were .85 (dominant leg) and .85 (nondominant leg). Confidence intervals ranged from .62–.95 and .61–.95 for dominant and nondominant legs, respectively. Bland-Altman plots showed all scores were within 2 standard deviations. A significant correlation was observed between the dominant and nondominant leg on balance scores (R2 ¼ .49, P , .05), and that better balance was associated with younger participants (nondominant leg: R2¼ .28, P , .05; dominant leg: R2 ¼ .39, P , .05) and a higher number of hours spent per week engaged in sporting activity (nondominant leg: R2 ¼ .37, P , .05). Conclusions: Using healthy active participants, the MSLHST was found to be a reliable clinical measure of balance. Younger participants who trained more have better balance scores. Future research may address the validity of the MSLHST.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Engineering
Publisher: National Athletic Trainers' Association
ISSN: 1062-6050
Last Modified: 21 Feb 2019 18:13
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/97487

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