Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

States of curiosity modulate hippocampus-dependent learning via the dopaminergic circuit

Gruber, Matthias J., Gelman, Bernard D. and Ranganath, Charan 2014. States of curiosity modulate hippocampus-dependent learning via the dopaminergic circuit. Neuron 84 (2) , pp. 486-496. 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.08.060

[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Post-Print Version
Download (474kB) | Preview

Abstract

People find it easier to learn about topics that interest them, but little is known about the mechanisms by which intrinsic motivational states affect learning. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how curiosity (intrinsic motivation to learn) influences memory. In both immediate and one-day-delayed memory tests, participants showed improved memory for information that they were curious about and for incidental material learned during states of high curiosity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging results revealed that activity in the midbrain and the nucleus accumbens was enhanced during states of high curiosity. Importantly, individual variability in curiosity-driven memory benefits for incidental material was supported by anticipatory activity in the midbrain and hippocampus and by functional connectivity between these regions. These findings suggest a link between the mechanisms supporting extrinsic reward motivation and intrinsic curiosity and highlight the importance of stimulating curiosity to create more effective learning experiences.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre (CUBRIC)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Publisher: Elsevier (Cell Press)
ISSN: 0896-6273
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 22 November 2017
Date of Acceptance: 29 August 2014
Last Modified: 12 Mar 2020 14:13
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/96033

Citation Data

Cited 118 times in Google Scholar. View in Google Scholar

Cited 142 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics