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What is happening to television news?

Sambrook, Richard Jeremy and Nielsen, Rasmus 2016. What is happening to television news? [Discussion Paper]. Oxford: Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, Oxford University. Available at: http://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/sites/de...

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Abstract

In this report, we analyse what is happening to television news. We map recent changes in traditional television viewing, the rise of online video, and a range of examples of how different organisations are working with new forms of television-like news developed for a digital environment. We show how recent years have seen signi cant declines in traditional television viewing in technologically developed markets, and a rapid rise in online video viewing driven by video-sharing sites, video-on-demand services, and the integration of video into social media sites. Television is still an important medium, and will remain so for years to come, but it will not be the dominant force it was in the second half of the twentieth century. Television viewing in countries like the UK and the US have declined by 3 to 4% per year on average since 2012. These declines are directly comparable to the declines in print newspaper circulation in the 2000s and if compounded over ten years will result in an overall decline in viewing of 25 to 30%. The average audience of many television news programmes is by now older than the average audience of many print newspapers. The decline in viewing among younger people is far more pronounced both for television viewing in general and for television news speci cally, meaning that the loyalty and habits of older viewers prop up overall viewing gures and risk obscuring the fact that television news is rapidly losing touch with much of the population.

Item Type: Monograph (Discussion Paper)
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General) > PN1990 Broadcasting
Publisher: Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, Oxford University
ISBN: 9781907384172
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 09:24
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/94612

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