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Women’s intentions to Human Papillomavirus self-sample: development of an intervention to increase self-sampling intentions

Williams, Denitza 2016. Women’s intentions to Human Papillomavirus self-sample: development of an intervention to increase self-sampling intentions. PhD Thesis, Cardiff University.
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Abstract

Testing for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is being incorporated into the cervical screening programme, with the probable future introduction of HPV as a primary test and a possibility of HPV self-sampling. In anticipation of this development, it is imperative to identify potential barriers to HPV self-sampling. The work presented in this thesis identified women’s attitudes and intentions regarding the possible introduction of primary HPV self-sampling, and developed a preliminary intervention designed to address barriers and increase intentions to HPV self-sample. A mixed-methods approach was used to explore women’s attitudes and intentions regarding HPV self-sampling through a cross-sectional questionnaire survey, in-depth qualitative interviews and intervention user testing. A questionnaire based on the extended Health Belief Model was developed and validated using content validity assessment and cognitive interviews. A survey of 194 women recruited through Cervical Screening Wales and in community settings identified that perceiving more barriers than benefits to HPV self-sampling, reporting lower self-efficacy in relation to self-sampling, and lower HPV knowledge were associated with lower hypothetical intention to HPV self-sample. Qualitative interviews with a sub-sample of 19 survey participants revealed further barriers including lack of confidence in ability to self-sample correctly, lack of confidence in self-sampling results, concerns about sample contamination and identity theft, and low confidence in the rationale for the introduction of a new screening programme. Content designed to address these barriers was incorporated into a leaflet designed to increase intentions to HPV self-sample. The leaflet was well received in user testing. Overall, findings suggest that if HPV self-sampling is incorporated into the cervical screening programme, personal and system barriers as well as concerns about operational factors will need to be addressed. The pilot HPV self-sampling intervention may be a mechanism for increasing intention to HPV self-sample by improving women’s HPV knowledge, confidence in their ability to self-sample properly, and confidence in operational factors. It is anticipated that this may alleviate women’s concerns about a new method of cervical screening, ultimately leading to increased uptake.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Status: Unpublished
Schools: Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 1 July 2016
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 09:13
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/92216

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