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The effect of chronic subarachnoid hemorrhage on basal endothelium-derived relaxing factor activity in intrathecal cerebral arteries

Edwards, David Hughes, Byrne, James V. and Griffith, Tudor M. 1992. The effect of chronic subarachnoid hemorrhage on basal endothelium-derived relaxing factor activity in intrathecal cerebral arteries. Journal of Neurosurgery 76 (5) , pp. 830-837. 10.3171/jns.1992.76.5.0830

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Abstract

The authors have investigated the hypothesis that loss of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) activity contributes to cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Adventitial exposure to hemoglobin was studied angiographically by injecting purified hemoglobin solution or autologous whole blood into the cisterna magna of anesthetized pigs. Both interventions induced intra- but not extracerebral vasoconstriction, which persisted for 2 and 7 days, respectively. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels were measured in isolated buffer-perfused pig intrathecal arteries to quantify inhibition of basal EDRF activity by hemoglobin. Adventitial exposure was less effective than intimal exposure, 10 µM hemoglobin applied adventitially for 30 minutes having an effect equivalent to that of 1 µM applied intraluminally for 5 minutes. The depression of cGMP levels by hemoglobin was reversible and equivalent to the effect of endothelial denudation or incubation with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, so that the effects of hemoglobin can be attributed to a specific action on EDRF rather than interaction with a nitric oxide-like substance produced by vascular smooth muscle or adventitial nerves. Cyclic GMP levels in isolated arteries were unchanged after in vivo exposure to hemoglobin for either 2 or 7 days or to whole blood for 2 days, and were reduced by intraluminal perfusion with 1 µM hemoglobin. In contrast, after 7 days of in vivo exposure to whole blood, cGMP levels were already depressed, and not further reduced by intraluminal perfusion with 1 µM hemoglobin. The findings support the view that adventitially applied hemoglobin can inhibit basal EDRF activity and that in vivo adventitial exposure to whole blood leads to a reduction in basal cGMP levels in association with vasoconstriction of intrathecal arteries. Both mechanisms could contribute to the clinical syndrome of cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Publisher: American Association of Neurological Surgeons
ISSN: 0022-3085
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 08:03
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/72312

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