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Patterns of help-seeking behaviour for toddlers from two contrasting socio-economic groups: new evidence on a neglected topic

Edwards, Adrian G. and Pill, Roisin 1996. Patterns of help-seeking behaviour for toddlers from two contrasting socio-economic groups: new evidence on a neglected topic. Family Practice 13 (4) , pp. 377-381. 10.1093/fampra/13.4.377

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Abstract

Objective. This descriptive study aimed to assess patterns in help-seeking behaviour for common childhood symptoms. Method. Clinic attenders aged 9–18 months of two child health clinics on Tyneside, UK, one with substantial economic deprivation, were studied. Outcome measures were parental reporting of common symptoms, utilization of professional advice and general practitioner records of consultations. Results. Children in the affluent area had had fewer general practitioner consultations (mean 7.3) than those in the poorer area (mean 15.1; 95% CI for difference 4.3–11.4). They were less likely to present with an episode of diarrhoea or cold but were as likely as the poorer group to present with fever. Behaviour problems were reported less frequently (23% versus 47%), but if present, this was far more likely to result in help seeking than in the poorer group (86% versus 33% P ≪ 0.05). Conclusions. Variations in help-seeking behaviour between two economically contrasting groups were identified; this has implications for clinical understanding and service provision in primary care.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics
Uncontrolled Keywords: Help-seeking behaviour
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISSN: 0263-2136
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 06:44
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/64218

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