Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Dietary phosphate and parathyroid hormone alter the expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) and the Na + -dependent P i transporter (NaPi-2) in the rat proximal tubule

Riccardi, Daniela, Traebert, Martin, Ward, Donald T., Kaissling, Brigitte, Biber, J., Hebert, Steven C. and Murer, Heini 2000. Dietary phosphate and parathyroid hormone alter the expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) and the Na + -dependent P i transporter (NaPi-2) in the rat proximal tubule. Pflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology 441 (2-3) , pp. 379-387. 10.1007/s004240000436

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Dietary phosphate (Pi) intake and parathyroid hormone (PTH) are essential regulators of proximal tubular (PT) Pi reabsorption; both factors are associated with adaptive changes in PT apical brush border membrane (BBM) Na/Pi-cotransport activity and specific transporter protein (NaPi-2) content. Urinary Pi excretion is also inversely correlated with luminal Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]) both in a PTH-dependent and -independent fashion. A cell-surface, Ca2+(/polyvalent cation)-sensing receptor (CaR) has been localized to the PT BBM with unknown function. To investigate whether PTH and/or dietary Pi intake could affect the distribution or the expression of the CaR, we evaluated their effects on rat kidney CaR and the NaPi-2 expression by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. A chronic high-Pi (1.2%) versus low-Pi (0.1%) diet and acute PTH (1–34) infusion significantly reduced the PT BBM expression of both NaPi-2 and CaR proteins. CaR-specific immunoreactivity in nephron segments other than the PT was not affected by PTH or Pi intake. These results suggest that reduced renal PT CaR expression by a high-Pi diet and by increased circulating PTH levels could contribute to the local control of PT handling of Ca2+ and Pi.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Biosciences
Publisher: Springer
ISSN: 0031-6768
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 06:40
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/63473

Citation Data

Cited 56 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item