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Reorganization of mycelial networks of Phanerochaete velutina in response to new woody resources and collembola (Folsomia candida) grazing

Wood, Jonathan, Tordoff, George M., Jones, T. Hefin and Boddy, Lynne 2006. Reorganization of mycelial networks of Phanerochaete velutina in response to new woody resources and collembola (Folsomia candida) grazing. Mycological Research 110 (8) , pp. 985-993. 10.1016/j.mycres.2006.05.013

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Abstract

Mycelial development of Phanerochaete velutina extending from wood inocula in 57 × 57 cm trays of non-sterile soil was characterized after adding: (1) collembola; (2) new wood resources; (3) both new wood resources and collembola; and (4) no new resources and no collembola. After 99 d, all systems had produced distinct mycelial cords, much of the diffuse mycelium and thinner cords that were produced early on having regressed. Systems to which new resources (but no collembola) had been added developed thick cords interconnecting inocula with new resources, and much of the non-connected mycelium regressed. Nonetheless, these systems had significantly greater hyphal coverage and mass fractal dimension than the other treatments, resulting from outgrowth from the new resources. Unexpectedly, morphology of grazed systems with no added resources was very similar to that of ungrazed systems with no added resources, apparently because the collembola grazed on senescing hyphae that would ultimately have regressed. Where new resources and collembola were added, there was proliferation of fine mycelium along connective cords and elsewhere, but this was not as extensive as in the new resource/no collembola systems, the fine mycelium apparently being grazed in patches. Fungus gnat (family Sciaridae) larvae contaminated eight (out of 14) trays with no added collembola, but none of the systems to which collembola had been added. They burrowed around the wood and caused cords to be severed.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Biosciences
ISSN: 0953-7562
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 06:36
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/62591

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