Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Repetitive olfactory exposure to the biologically Significant steroid androstadienone causes a hedonic shift and gender dimorphic changes in olfactory-evoked potentials

Boulkroune, Nassima, Wang, Liwei, March, Amy, Walker, Natalie and Jacob, Timothy John Claud 2007. Repetitive olfactory exposure to the biologically Significant steroid androstadienone causes a hedonic shift and gender dimorphic changes in olfactory-evoked potentials. Neuropsychopharmacology 32 (8) , pp. 1822-1829. 10.1038/sj.npp.1301303

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

The function of a sensory system is to transduce and relay sensory information in a constant and reproducible manner. However, in the olfactory processing of certain steroids this precept of sensory constancy does not appear to apply. Using threshold testing, psychometrics, and electrophysiological techniques, we investigated the effects of a repetitive exposure protocol on the response to androstadienone. Androstadienone is a steroid found in human secretions that has been widely proposed as a candidate for a human pheromone. The detection threshold, hedonic perception, and evoked potential response all changed following repetitive exposure to androstadienone and not to a control odorant, benzaldehyde. Furthermore, the exposure-dependent changes in evoked potentials exhibited a gender dimorphism in which there were changes in the later components of the evoked potentials specific to women. These components have been associated with cognitive and perceptual operations. This 'learning' to smell a compound found in sweat may be related to biological signaling.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Biosciences
ISSN: 0893-133X
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 06:35
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/62372

Citation Data

Cited 34 times in Google Scholar. View in Google Scholar

Cited 27 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item