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Randomised controlled trial of a brief early psychological intervention following acute physical injury

Bisson, Jonathan Ian, Shepherd, Jonathan Paul, Joy, Diamond and Probert, R. 2000. Randomised controlled trial of a brief early psychological intervention following acute physical injury. Journal of Psychosomatic Research 48 (3) , p. 224.

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Abstract

Aim: This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a four session cognitive behavioural intervention following acute physical injury. Method: Subjects who had sustained physical injury and displayed acute psychological distress were recruited to the study through the Cardiff Emergency Unit. They completed a battery of questionnaires and were randomised to intervention or no intervention groups. The intervention occurred between four and ten weeks post injury. Subjects were interviewed by an assessor blind to the randomisation at three and thirteen months following their injury. Results: One hundred and fifty-two individuals were recruited. Road traffic accidents and assaults accounted for 90% of the injuries. Intention to treat analysis revealed significant reductions in Impact of Event Scale (IES) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores over time in both the intervention and control groups although the reductions were greater in the intervention group. The IES score reduced by a mean of 10.03 (sd 18.0) at three months and 20.7 (sd 22.3) at thirteen months from a baseline of 47.0 (sd 16.7) in the intervention group and by a mean of 5.4 (sd 16.3) at three months and 11.2 (sd 18.1) at thirteen months from a baseline of 45.0 (sd 15.5) in the control group. The difference between groups was not statistically significant at three months (p = 0.1) but was at thirteen months (p = 0.005). The greater reductions in depression and anxiety scores in the intervention group compared to the control group were not statistically significant. Conclusion: This study suggests that a four session cognitive behavioural intervention reduces symptoms of PTSD following acute physical injury and is well tolerated by those who receive it.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (CNGG)
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Additional Information: Abstract of the 23rd European congress of psychosomatic research, June 17–21, Oslo, Norway: Symposium 7. Outcome and treatment of accidental injury and trauma, 19.06.00, 16:15–18:15
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0022-3999
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 04:54
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/46348

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