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The functional anatomy of suggested limb paralysis

Deeley, Quinton, Oakley, David A., Toone, Brian, Bell, Vaughan, Walsh, Eamonn, Marquand, Andre F., Giampietro, Vincent, Brammer, Michael J., Williams, Steven C. R., Mehta, Mitul A. and Halligan, Peter 2013. The functional anatomy of suggested limb paralysis. Cortex 49 (2) , pp. 411-422. 10.1016/j.cortex.2012.09.016

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Abstract

Suggestions of limb paralysis in highly hypnotically suggestible subjects have been employed to successfully model conversion disorders, revealing similar patterns of brain activation associated with attempted movement of the affected limb. However, previous studies differ with regard to the executive regions involved during involuntary inhibition of the affected limb. This difference may have arisen as previous studies did not control for differences in hypnosis depth between conditions and/or include subjective measures to explore the experience of suggested paralysis. In the current study we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the functional anatomy of left and right upper limb movements in eight healthy subjects selected for high hypnotic suggestibility during (i) hypnosis (NORMAL) and (ii) attempted movement following additional left upper limb paralysis suggestions (PARALYSIS). Contrast of left upper limb motor function during NORMAL relative to PARALYSIS conditions revealed greater activation of contralateral M1/S1 and ipsilateral cerebellum, consistent with the engagement of these regions in the completion of movements. By contrast, two significant observations were noted in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions. In conjunction with reports of attempts to move the paralysed limb, greater supplementary motor area (SMA) activation was observed, a finding consistent with the role of SMA in motor intention and planning. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, BA 24) was also significantly more active in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions – suggesting that ACC (BA 24) may be implicated in involuntary, as well as voluntary inhibition of prepotent motor responses.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords: Dissociation; Conversion disorder; Hypnosis; fMRI; Brain; Cultural neuroscience
Publisher: Elsevier Masson
ISSN: 0010-9452
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 04:47
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/44632

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