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Drugs and human memory: effects of low doses of nitrazepam and hyoscine on retention

Jones, Dylan Marc, Jones, M. E., Lewis, Malcolm John and Spriggs, T. L. 1979. Drugs and human memory: effects of low doses of nitrazepam and hyoscine on retention. British Journal Of Clinical Pharmacology 7 (5) , pp. 479-483. 10.1111/j.1365-2125.1979.tb00989.x

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Abstract

1 The effects of diazepam (5 mg) and hyoscine hydrobromide (0.3 mg) were assessed in two memory tasks: short-term retention of digit strings and the free recall of items from categorizable lists. 2 One hundred and two healthy subjects were tested in an independent-groups design. Subjects were assigned randomly to either placebo, diazepam or hyoscine groups. Treatments were administered orally under double-blind conditions. 3 The short-term retention of digits was impaired to an equivalent degree and locus for both drugs (P less than 0.05). This effect was ascribed to the action on primary memory. 4 The drugs produced no significant effects on the recall of categorizable lists either in terms of the number of words recalled or the cohesiveness of categorical recall. 5 These results demonstrate that drugs of different pharmacological actions produce isomorphic psychological deficits in memory and that 'anti-memory' effects on one task should not be extrapolated to all aspects of memory.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Pharmacy
Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RS Pharmacy and materia medica
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing
ISSN: 0306-5251
Last Modified: 24 Jun 2017 09:59
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/44350

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