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Constructing public opinion: how political elites do what they like and why we seem to go along with it

Lewis, Justin Matthew Wren 2001. Constructing public opinion: how political elites do what they like and why we seem to go along with it. Columbia University Press.

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Abstract

Is polling a process that brings "science" into the study of society? Or are polls crude instruments that tell us little about the way people actually think? The role of public opinion polls in government and mass media has gained increasing importance with each new election or poll taken. Here Lewis presents a new look at an old tradition, the first study of opinion polls using an interdisciplinary approach combining cultural studies, sociology, political science, and mass communication. Rather than dismissing polls, he considers them to be a significant form of representation in contemporary culture; he explores how the media report on polls and, in turn, how publicized results influence the way people respond to polls. Lewis argues that the media tend to exclude the more progressive side of popular opinion from public debate. While the media's influence is limited, it works strategically to maintain the power of pro-corporate political elites.

Item Type: Book
Book Type: Authored Book
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Journalism, Media and Culture
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231117661
Last Modified: 19 Mar 2018 16:54
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/3997

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Cited 132 times in Google Scholar. View in Google Scholar

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