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Task-related changes in cortical synchronisation are spatially coincident with the hemodynamic response

Singh, Krish Devi, Barnes, Gareth R., Hillebrand, Arjan, Forde, Emer M.E and WIlliams, Adrian L. 2002. Task-related changes in cortical synchronisation are spatially coincident with the hemodynamic response. NeuroImage 16 (1) , pp. 103-114. 10.1006/nimg.2001.1050

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Abstract

Using group functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and group Magnetoencephalography (MEG) we studied two cognitive paradigms: A language task involving covert letter fluency and a visual task involving biological motion direction discrimination. The MEG data were analyzed using an adaptive beam-former technique known as Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry (SAM), which provides continuous 3-D images of cortical power changes. These images were spatially normalized and averaged across subjects to provide a group SAM image in the same template space as the group fMRI data. The results show that frequency-specific, task-related changes in cortical synchronization, detected using MEG, match those areas of the brain showing an evoked cortical hemodynamic response with fMRI. The majority of these changes were event-related desynchronizations (ERDs) in the 5–10 Hz and 15–25 Hz frequency ranges. Our study demonstrates how SAM, spatial normalization, and intersubject averaging enable group MEG studies to be performed. SAM analysis also allows the MEG experiment to have exactly the same task design as the corresponding fMRI experiment. This new analysis framework represents an important advance in the use of MEG as a cognitive neuroimaging technique and also allows mutual cross-validation with fMRI.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 1095-9572
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 01:50
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/3391

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