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Application of the theory of planned behaviour to the prediction of objectively assessed breaking of posted speed limits

Conner, Mark, Lawton, Rebecca, Parker, Dianne, Chorlton, Kathryn, Manstead, Antony Stephen Reid and Stradling, Stephen 2007. Application of the theory of planned behaviour to the prediction of objectively assessed breaking of posted speed limits. British Journal of Psychology 98 (3) , pp. 429-453. 10.1348/000712606X133597

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Abstract

In two studies the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) including moral norms, anticipated regret and past behaviour was applied to predicting intention to exceed the posted speed limit across different roads and objectively assessed speeding behaviour. All measures except behaviour were taken by self-report questionnaires referring to different driving scenarios. The behaviour measures were based on performance in a simulator (Study 1) or unobtrusive on-road speed camera assessment taken without driver awareness (Study 2) across roads with varying posted speed limits. Results are reported averaged across road types in both studies. In Study 1 (N = 83), 82% of the variance in intentions to speed was explained, with attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control (PBC), moral norms, anticipated regret and past behaviour being significant predictors. A total of 35% of the variance in speed as assessed on a driving simulator was accounted for with intentions, PBC, moral norms and previous accidents being significant predictors. In Study 2 (N = 303), 76% of the variance in intentions to speed was explained with attitudes, moral norms, anticipated regret and past behaviour being significant predictors. A total of 17% of the variance in speed as assessed on-road was accounted for with intentions and moral norms being significant. Practical implications of the findings for road safety are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Publisher: British Psychological Society
ISSN: 0007-1269
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 04:06
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/32791

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