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Associations between deprivation, attitudes towards eating breakfast and breakfast eating behaviours in 9-11 year olds

Moore, Graham, Tapper, Katy, Murphy, Simon, Lynch, Rebecca Jayne, Raisanen, Lawrence Matthew, Pimm, Claire Elizabeth and Moore, Laurence Anthony Russell 2007. Associations between deprivation, attitudes towards eating breakfast and breakfast eating behaviours in 9-11 year olds. Public Health Nutrition 10 (6) , pp. 582-589. 10.1017/S1368980007699558

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Abstract

Objectives To examine school-level relationships between deprivation and breakfast eating behaviours (breakfast skipping and the healthfulness of foods consumed) in 9–11-year-old schoolchildren and to examine whether attitudes towards eating breakfast mediated these relationships. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting One hundred and eleven primary schools in Wales. Subjects Year 5 and 6 pupils within the 111 primary schools. Measures were completed by 4314 children. Analysis was conducted at the group (school) level, with each school representing one group. Results Deprivation was positively associated with breakfast skipping and consumption of ‘unhealthy’ items (i.e. sweet snacks, crisps) for breakfast. A significant negative association was found between deprivation and consumption of ‘healthy’ items (i.e. fruit, bread, cereal, milk). Deprivation was significantly inversely associated with attitudes towards eating breakfast. The relationships between deprivation and (1) breakfast skipping and (2) consumption of ‘healthy’ items for breakfast were mediated by attitudes towards eating breakfast. The hypothesis that attitudes mediated the relationship between deprivation and consumption of ‘unhealthy’ breakfast items was unsupported. Conclusions Deprivation is associated with adverse breakfast eating behaviours amongst children aged 9–11 years, in terms of breakfast skipping and the quality of breakfasts consumed. Socio-economic differences in attitudes towards eating breakfast are apparent amongst this age group, and appear to relate to social gradients in breakfast eating behaviours. Research is needed to examine the causal nature of these trends and to elucidate factors underlying the development of socio-economic differences in eating-related cognitions.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Medicine
MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (CNGG)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
Uncontrolled Keywords: Breakfast; Attitudes; Socio-economic status; Children; Diet; Nutrition; Health
Additional Information: Publisher’s copyright requirements: “All contributors retain the right to post the definitive version of the contribution as published at Cambridge Journals Online (in PDF or HTML form) in the Institutional Repository of the institution in which they worked at the time the paper was first submitted, or (for appropriate journals) in PubMed Central or UK PubMed Central, no sooner than one year after first publication of the paper in the journal, subject to file availability and provided the posting includes a prominent statement of the full bibliographical details, a copyright notice in the name of the copyright holder (Cambridge University Press or the sponsoring Society, as appropriate), and a link to the online edition of the journal at Cambridge Journals Online. Inclusion of this definitive version after one year in Institutional Repositories outside of the institution in which the contributor worked at the time the paper was first submitted will be subject to the additional permission of Cambridge University Press (not to be unreasonably withheld). See: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/forAuthors?page=copyright
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISSN: 1368-9800
Last Modified: 01 Oct 2019 23:05
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/3147

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