Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Surface bacteriology of venous leg ulcers and healing outcome

Moore, Keith, Hall, Val, Paull, Alan, Morris, Trefor E., Brown, Sarah, McCulloch, Dorothy, Richardson, Mark C. and Harding, Keith Gordon 2010. Surface bacteriology of venous leg ulcers and healing outcome. Journal of Clinical Pathology 63 (9) , pp. 830-834. 10.1136/jcp.2010.077032

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

AIM: Bacteria can be cultured from all venous leg ulcers (VLUs) regardless of healing status, and the significance of a positive swab result in non-clinically infected ulcers is unknown. The aim of this study was to characterise the bacteriological flora of VLUs by routine culture to determine whether the data generated had prognostic value. METHODS: The ulcers of 178 patients were sampled weekly for 12 weeks and healing outcome monitored while the limb was treated with graduated compression. Wound bacteriology was assessed using culture methodology standardised to ensure data reproducibility. RESULTS: 153 individual bacterial species were identified. The species most frequently found were Staphylococcus aureus (64.3% of assessments), Corynebacterium striatum (60.6%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (32.6%), Helcococcus kunzii (22.0%), Finegoldia magna (21.4%) and Proteus mirabilis (16.1%). No single species or the presence of anaerobes and increasing diversity of bacterial species, previously thought to be predictive of impaired healing, was shown to be associated with healing outcome. The presence of C striatum was associated with healing outcome but not after adjusting for the known prognostic factors of wound area and duration. CONCLUSION: Routine bacteriological culture analysis of the VLU wound surface may be used to identify diverse flora in all ulcers. However, the data generated are of no additional value as a prognostic indicator of healing outcome. The presence of C striatum may represent colonisation of non-healing VLU by normal skin flora.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN: 0021-9746
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 03:52
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/28300

Citation Data

Cited 28 times in Google Scholar. View in Google Scholar

Cited 26 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Cited 21 times in Web of Science. View in Web of Science.

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item