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Modeling the contribution of neuron-astrocyte cross talk to slow blood oxygenation level-dependent signal oscillations

DiNuzzo, M., Gili, Tommaso, Maraviglia, B. and Giove, F. 2011. Modeling the contribution of neuron-astrocyte cross talk to slow blood oxygenation level-dependent signal oscillations. Journal of Neurophysiology 106 (6) , pp. 3010-3018. 10.1152/jn.00416.2011

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Abstract

A consistent and prominent feature of brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is the presence of low-frequency (<0.1 Hz) fluctuations of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal that are thought to reflect spontaneous neuronal activity. In this report we provide modeling evidence that cyclic physiological activation of astroglial cells produces similar BOLD oscillations through a mechanism mediated by intracellular Ca2+ signaling. Specifically, neurotransmission induces pulses of Ca2+ concentration in astrocytes, resulting in increased cerebral perfusion and neuroactive transmitter release by these cells (i.e., gliotransmission), which in turn stimulates neuronal activity. Noticeably, the level of neuron-astrocyte cross talk regulates the periodic behavior of the Ca2+ wave-induced BOLD fluctuations. Our results suggest that the spontaneous ongoing activity of neuroglial networks is a potential source of the observed slow fMRI signal oscillations.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre (CUBRIC)
Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Uncontrolled Keywords: astrocytes; calcium waves; brain resting state
Publisher: American Physiological Society
ISSN: 0022-3077
Last Modified: 10 Oct 2017 14:13
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/26762

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