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The development and use of the UK environmental futures scenarios: Perspectives from cultural theory

Eames, Malcolm and Skea, J. 2002. The development and use of the UK environmental futures scenarios: Perspectives from cultural theory. Greener Management International (37) , pp. 53-70.

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Abstract

This paper addresses links between the UK Foresight Programme's Environmental Futures scenarios and grid-group cultural theory. The scenarios were originally intended to inform thinking about developments in the environmental policy arena in the United Kingdom over the period 2010-40. They have subsequently been used in a variety of fields, ranging from energy futures through to crime prevention. The four scenarios were based on a two-by-two grid defined by two axes relating to social values and governance systems. The paper discusses the correspondence between the four scenarios and the four cultural types defined by grid-group cultural theory. It is argued that these linkages go some way towards explaining the apparent universal appeal and scope of the four Environmental Futures scenarios. The paper goes on to explore patterns of usage of the scenarios and the ways in which users have interpreted the original scenario work. Finally, the paper argues that insights from cultural theory could be used to develop the scenarios further; for example, by enhancing their capacity to deal with 'surprises' as opposed to incremental developments.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Architecture
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
T Technology > TD Environmental technology. Sanitary engineering
Publisher: Greenleaf Publishing
ISSN: 0966-9671
Last Modified: 28 Jun 2019 02:11
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/24327

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