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Optimal maturation of the SIV-Specific CD8+ T cell response after primary infection is associated with natural control of SIV: ANRS SIC study

Passaes, Caroline, Millet, Antoine, Madelain, Vincent, Monceaux, Valérie, David, Annie, Versmisse, Pierre, Sylla, Naya, Gostick, Emma, Llewellyn-Lacey, Sian, Price, David A., Blancher, Antoine, Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie, Desjardins, Delphine, Pancino, Gianfranco, Le Grand, Roger, Lambotte, Olivier, Müller-Trutwin, Michaela, Rouzioux, Christine, Guedj, Jérémie, Avettand-Fenoel, Véronique, Vaslin, Bruno and Sáez-Cirión, Asier 2020. Optimal maturation of the SIV-Specific CD8+ T cell response after primary infection is associated with natural control of SIV: ANRS SIC study. Cell Reports 32 (12) , 108174. 10.1016/j.celrep.2020.108174

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Abstract

Highly efficient CD8+ T cells are associated with natural HIV control, but it has remained unclear how these cells are generated and maintained. We have used a macaque model of spontaneous SIVmac251 control to monitor the development of efficient CD8+ T cell responses. Our results show that SIV-specific CD8+ T cells emerge during primary infection in all animals. The ability of CD8+ T cells to suppress SIV is suboptimal in the acute phase but increases progressively in controller macaques before the establishment of sustained low-level viremia. Controller macaques develop optimal memory-like SIV-specific CD8+ T cells early after infection. In contrast, a persistently skewed differentiation phenotype characterizes memory SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in non-controller macaques. Accordingly, the phenotype of SIV-specific CD8+ T cells defined early after infection appears to favor the development of protective immunity in controllers, whereas SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in non-controllers fail to gain antiviral potency, feasibly as a consequence of early defects imprinted in the memory pool.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 2211-1247
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 14 October 2020
Date of Acceptance: 28 August 2020
Last Modified: 15 Oct 2020 12:32
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/135584

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