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Assessment of a self-assembling peptide gel, SPG-178, in providing a clear operative field for trabeculectomy surgery for glaucoma in an animal model

Matsushita, Kenji, Kawashima, Rumi, Uesugi, Koji, Okada, Haruka, Sakaguchi, Hirokazu, Quantock, Andrew J. and Nishida, Kohji 2020. Assessment of a self-assembling peptide gel, SPG-178, in providing a clear operative field for trabeculectomy surgery for glaucoma in an animal model. Scientific Reports 10 (1) , 11326. 10.1038/s41598-020-68171-3

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Abstract

The presence of blood during ophthalmic surgery is problematic, as it can obstruct a surgeon’s view of the operative field. This is particularly true when performing trabeculectomy surgery to enhance ocular fluid outflow and reduce intraocular pressure as a treatment for glaucoma, one of the most common vision loss conditions worldwide. In this study, we investigated the performance of a transparent, self-assembling peptide gel (SPG-178) and its ability to maintain visibility during trabeculectomy surgery. Unlike the hyaluronic acid gel commonly used in ophthalmic surgery, SPG-178 did not permit the ingress of blood into the gel itself. Rather, it forced blood to flow peripherally to the gel. Moreover, if bleeding occurred under the SPG-178 gel, perfusion with saline was able to effectively flush the blood away along the interface between the SPG-178 and the ocular tissue (in this case scleral) to clear the surgical field of view. In experimental trabeculectomy surgeries with mitomycin C used as an adjuvant, there were no differences in the postoperative recovery of intraocular pressure or bleb morphology with or without the use of SPG-178. SPG-178, therefore, when used in a gel formulation, represents a new material for use in intraocular surgery to ensure a clear operative field with likely beneficial treatment outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Schools: Optometry and Vision Sciences
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
ISSN: 2045-2322
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 28 September 2020
Last Modified: 28 Sep 2020 09:45
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/135134

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