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Implementing effective positive psychology interventions to support the well-being of young people in schools: A meta-analysis of randomised and non-randomised interventions and a Q study of educational psychologists’ perceptions regarding effective implementation

Wright, David 2020. Implementing effective positive psychology interventions to support the well-being of young people in schools: A meta-analysis of randomised and non-randomised interventions and a Q study of educational psychologists’ perceptions regarding effective implementation. DEdPsy Thesis, Cardiff University.
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Abstract

Context: In recent years there has been an increased focus upon supporting the psychological well-being of young people in UK schools. Positive psychology provides a well suited framework for educational psychologists (EPs) to implement well-being interventions. However, the efficacy of multi-component positive psychology interventions (PPIs) in schools has not yet been well established. Furthermore, it is essential that consideration is given to how EPs can best support schools to implement interventions effectively, as factors such as implementation quality have been shown to be vital to ensure intervention efficacy. Objectives: To estimate the efficacy of multi-component PPIs at improving the wellbeing of children and young people in schools and to explore how EPs can best support schools with the effective implementation of well-being interventions. Methodology: A meta-analysis of the research evidence was conducted in order to estimate the effectiveness of multi-component PPIs at improving the well-being of children and young people in schools. In addition, a Q study was conducted to explore the perceptions of 24 EPs regarding the effective implementation of PPIs in schools. Participants were required to sort 40 statements regarding possible procedures into a forced choice quasi-normal distribution. Results: A random-effects model meta-analysis was conducted using twenty-two studies that met the inclusion criteria. Multi-component PPIs had a bias-adjusted pooled effect size of r = 0.22; 95% CIs 0.09-0.36; p < 0.05; indicating a small positive effect size. Significant heterogeneity among studies was observed (I2 = 97.8%). Moderator analysis showed that interventions delivered by researchers were significantly more effective than interventions delivered by teachers, however a large degree of heterogeneity remained. Additional analyses did not reveal any further contextual moderators. Within the Q study, EPs gave their views on the most practical and effective methods to support schools to implement PPIs. Q sort analysis revealed that participants significantly loaded onto four factors: working strategically, working systemically, supporting a whole-school approach, and providing training and supporting highquality implementation. Conclusions: Multi-component PPIs appear to be effective at improving the well-being of young people in schools and may provide a useful framework for EPs and their service users. However, the effect size is relatively small and appears to be moderated by a number of unknown contextual factors. Results from the Q study provide some practical and pragmatic suggestions for EPs to facilitate the effective implementation of well-being interventions.

Item Type: Thesis (DEdPsy)
Date Type: Completion
Status: Unpublished
Schools: Biosciences
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 8 July 2020
Last Modified: 13 Jul 2020 08:28
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/133195

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