Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Active duty and ex-serving military personnel with post-traumatic stress disorder treated with psychological therapies: systematic review and meta-analysis

Kitchiner, Neil J., Lewis, Catrin, Roberts, Neil P. and Bisson, Jonathan I. 2019. Active duty and ex-serving military personnel with post-traumatic stress disorder treated with psychological therapies: systematic review and meta-analysis. European Journal of Psychotraumatology 10 (1) , 1684226. 10.1080/20008198.2019.1684226

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a major cause of morbidity amongst active duty and ex-serving military personnel. In recent years increasing efforts have been made to develop more effective treatments. Objective: To determine which psychological therapies are efficacious in treating active duty and ex-serving military personnel with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: A systematic review was undertaken according to Cochrane Collaboration Guidelines. The primary outcome measure was reduction in PTSD symptoms and the secondary outcome dropout. Results: Twenty-four studies with 2386 participants were included. Evidence demonstrated that CBT with a trauma focus (CBT-TF) was associated with the largest evidence of effect when compared to waitlist/usual care in reducing PTSD symptoms post treatment (10 studies; n = 524; SMD −1.22, −1.78 to −0.66). Group CBT-TF was less effective when compared to individual CBT-TF at reducing PTSD symptoms post treatment (1 study; n = 268; SMD −0.35, −0.11 to −0.59). Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy was not effective when compared to waitlist/usual care at reducing PTSD symptoms post treatment (4 studies; n = 92; SMD −0.83, −1.75 to 0.10). There was evidence of greater dropout from CBT-TF therapies compared to waitlist and Present Centred Therapy. Conclusions: The evidence, albeit limited, supports individual CBT-TF as the first-line psychological treatment of PTSD in active duty and ex-serving personnel. There is evidence for Group CBT-TF, but this is not as strong as for individual CBT-TF. EMDR cannot be recommended as a first line therapy at present and urgently requires further evaluation. Lower effect sizes than for other populations with PTSD and high levels of drop-out suggest that CBT-TF in its current formats is not optimally acceptable and further research is required to develop and evaluate more effective treatments for PTSD and complex PTSD in active duty and ex-serving military personnel.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Published Online
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (CNGG)
Publisher: Taylor && Francis
ISSN: 2000-8198
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 23 January 2020
Date of Acceptance: 23 September 2019
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2020 17:05
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/128951

Citation Data

Cited 6 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics