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A genetic risk assessment for prostate cancer influences patients’ risk perception and use of repeat PSA testing: a cross-sectional study in Danish general practice

Fredsoe, Jacob, Kirkegaard, Pia, Edwards, Adrian, Vedsted, Peter, Sorensen, Karina D. and Bro, Flemming 2020. A genetic risk assessment for prostate cancer influences patients’ risk perception and use of repeat PSA testing: a cross-sectional study in Danish general practice. British Journal of General Practice 4 (2) , 101039. 10.3399/bjgpopen20X101039

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Abstract

Background Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer among men in the western world. Genetic lifetime risk assessment could alleviate controversies about prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing for early diagnosis. Aim To determine how men interpret information about their lifetime risk for PC and how this can affect their choice of having a repeated PSA test. Design & setting A genetic test was offered for assessment of individual PC lifetime risk in general practices in Denmark, with the purpose of promoting appropriate use of PSA testing. Method Participants had a genetic lifetime risk assessment for PC diagnosis (either high or normal risk). A month after receiving the result, participants answered a questionnaire about their perceived risk of getting or dying from PC compared with other men, as well as their intentions for repeated PSA testing. Results Nearly half (44.7%) of 555 participants who received the genetic risk assessment were not aware they had a genetic test. Nevertheless, compared with men with a normal genetic risk, those with high genetic risk reported higher perceived risk for PC (mean difference of 0.74 [95% confidence interval {CI} = 0.56 to 0.96] on a 5-point scale), higher perceived risk of dying from PC (mean difference of 0.48 [95% CI = 0.29 to 0.66] on a 5-point scale), and increased intention for repeated PSA testing (mean difference of 0.48 [95% CI = 0.30 to 0.65] on a 4-point scale). Conclusion Despite low awareness and/or understanding of the test result, a high genetic risk for PC made participants more aware of their risk, and it increased their intention and probability for repeated PSA testing.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Publisher: Royal College of General Practitioners
ISSN: 0960-1643
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 14 January 2020
Date of Acceptance: 10 January 2020
Last Modified: 29 Jun 2020 12:29
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/128513

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