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School connectedness as a moderator for associations between parent-child relationship quality and adolescent use of alcohol, tobacco and cannabis

Yapp, Rhiannon 2019. School connectedness as a moderator for associations between parent-child relationship quality and adolescent use of alcohol, tobacco and cannabis. PhD Thesis, Cardiff University.
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Abstract

Adolescent alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use is associated with costs to health services, the economy and wider society. Adolescents in the United Kingdom report some of the highest levels of alcohol use in Europe. Tobacco and cannabis use are less prevalent but associated with significant harms to health. Both parent child relationship quality (PCRQ) and school connectedness have been associated with alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use in adolescence. However, little is known on the role that school connectedness plays in the development of adolescent’s use of alcohol, tobacco and cannabis. This thesis presents findings from six systematic reviews which summarised the results of longitudinal studies reporting on a) the associations between PCRQ and alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use; b) the associations between school connectedness and adolescent alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use; and c) school connectedness as a moderator of associations between PCRQ and adolescent alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use. This thesis further presents findings from longitudinal analysis of a population-based birth cohort, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) whereby, multivariate logistic models were used to examine associations between PCRQ (age 9 years), school connectedness (age 11 years) and alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use (age 17 years), and whether school connectedness (age 11 years) moderated associations between PCRQ (age 9 years) and alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use (age 17 years). Systematic reviews found inconclusive evidence for an association between PCRQ and adolescent alcohol use, moderate evidence for an association with adolescent tobacco use, and weak evidence for an association with adolescent cannabis use. They further found moderate evidence for an association between school connectedness and adolescent alcohol use, strong evidence for an association with adolescent tobacco use, and moderate evidence for an association with adolescent cannabis use. No studies were found to examine the moderating effect of school connectedness. Multivariate logistic regression models showed that PCRQ at nine years of age was not significantly associated with experimental or hazardous alcohol use, smoking or nicotine dependence, cannabis use nor cannabis dependence at 17 years of age. School connectedness at 11 years of age was associated with alcohol use, but no other outcome measures at 17 years of age. School connectedness at 11 years of age did not moderate any associations between PCRQ at 9 years of age and outcomes at 17 years of age. Overall, there was little evidence to support the hypothesis that PCRQ is associated with use of alcohol, tobacco and cannabis in adolescence. There was some support for a beneficial association between school connectedness in reducing the risk of substance misuse in adolescence in the published peer reviewed literature. There was no support for school connectedness moderating the effect of PCRQ on use of alcohol, tobacco and cannabis in adolescence.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Date Type: Completion
Status: Unpublished
Schools: Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Funders: ESRC
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 7 August 2019
Last Modified: 07 Aug 2019 13:22
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/124771

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