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The Grown in Wales Study: Examining dietary patterns, custom birthweight centiles and the risk of delivering a small-for-gestational age (SGA) infant

Garay, Samantha M, Savory, Katrina A, Sumption, Lorna, Penketh, Richard, Janssen, Anna B and John, Rosalind M 2019. The Grown in Wales Study: Examining dietary patterns, custom birthweight centiles and the risk of delivering a small-for-gestational age (SGA) infant. PLoS ONE 14 (3) , e0213412. 10.1371/journal.pone.0213412

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Abstract

Objectives Maternal lifestyles, including diet, have been linked to infant birthweight. However, customised birthweight centiles (CBWC), which more accurately identify small babies that have increased fetal growth restriction and are at higher risk of newborn morbidity and later life health complications, are rarely considered when studying maternal diet. This study investigated maternal dietary patterns and their impact on infant CBWC within a cohort of women living in South Wales. Methods This study utilised cross-sectional data from the longitudinal Grown in Wales (GiW) cohort. Women 18–45 years old were recruited the morning prior to an elective caesarean section (ELCS). Women completed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Additional data on pregnancy and birth outcomes was extracted from medical notes. Data from 303 participants was analysed. Results ‘Western’ and ‘Health conscious dietary patterns were identified. The ‘Health Conscious’ dietary pattern was significantly associated with maternal BMI, age, education, income and exercise. Adjusted regression analyses indicated that greater adherence to a ‘Health Conscious’ dietary pattern was significantly associated with increased CBWC (AOR = 4.75 [95% CI: 1.17, 8.33] p = .010) and reduced risk of delivering a small-for-gestational age (SGA) infant (AOR = .51 [95% CI: .26, .99] p = .046). Conclusion A healthier diet was significantly associated with higher birthweight using CBWC and a reduced risk of delivering an SGA infant suggesting that birthweight will be improved in areas of Wales by focused support encouraging healthier dietary habits.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Biosciences
Publisher: Public Library of Science
ISSN: 1932-6203
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 6 March 2019
Date of Acceptance: 4 March 2019
Last Modified: 31 May 2019 20:10
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/120264

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