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Using Idiothetic Cues to Swim a Path With a Fixed Trajectory and Distance: Necessary Involvement of the Hippocampus, but Not the Retrosplenial Cortex

Zheng, Y., Pearce, John M., Vann, Seralynne Denise, Good, Mark Andrew, Jenkins, T. A., Smith, P. F. and Aggleton, John Patrick 2003. Using Idiothetic Cues to Swim a Path With a Fixed Trajectory and Distance: Necessary Involvement of the Hippocampus, but Not the Retrosplenial Cortex. Behavioral Neuroscience 117 (6) , pp. 1363-1377. 10.1037/0735-7044.117.6.1363

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Abstract

Rats rapidly learned to find a submerged platform in a water maze at a constant distance and angle from the start point, which changed on every trial. The rats performed accurately in the light and dark, but prior rotation disrupted the latter condition. The rats were then retested after receiving cytotoxic hippocampal or retrosplenial cortex lesions. Retrosplenial lesions had no apparent effect in either the light or dark. Hippocampal lesions impaired performance in both conditions but spared the ability to locate a platform placed in the center of the pool. A hippocampal deficit emerged when this pool-center task was run in the dark. The spatial effects of hippocampal damage extend beyond allocentric tasks to include aspects of idiothetic guidance.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Psychology
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Publisher: American Psychological Association
ISSN: 0735-7044
Last Modified: 03 Nov 2018 22:58
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/11384

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