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Does dairy food intake predict arterial stiffness and blood pressure in men?: Evidence from the Caerphilly prospective study

Livingstone, K, Lovegrovee, J, Cockcroft, John Ronald, Elwood, Peter Creighton, Pickering, Janet and Givens, D 2013. Does dairy food intake predict arterial stiffness and blood pressure in men?: Evidence from the Caerphilly prospective study. Hypertension 61 (1) , pp. 42-47. 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.00026

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Abstract

Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease events and mortality, and like blood pressure, may be influenced by dairy food intake. Few studies have investigated the effects of consumption of these foods on prospective measures of arterial stiffness. The present analysis aimed to investigate the prospective relationship between milk, cheese, cream, and butter consumption and aortic pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as well as cross-sectional relationships between these foods and systolic and diastolic blood pressure and metabolic markers using data from the Caerphilly Prospective Study. Included in this cohort were 2512 men, aged 45 to 59 years, who were followed up at 5-year intervals for a mean of 22.8 years (number follow-up 787). Augmentation index was 1.8% lower in subjects in the highest quartiles of dairy product intake compared with the lowest (P trend=0.021), whereas in the highest group of milk consumption systolic blood pressure was 10.4 mm Hg lower (P trend=0.033) than in nonmilk consumers after a 22.8-year follow-up. Cross-sectional analyses indicated that across increasing quartiles of butter intake, insulin (P trend=0.011), triacylglycerol (P trend=0.023), total cholesterol (P trend=0.002), and diastolic blood pressure (P trend=0.027) were higher. Across increasing groups of milk intake and quartiles of dairy product intake, glucose (P trend=0.032) and triglyceride concentrations (P trend=0.031) were lower, respectively. The present results confirm that consumption of milk predicts prospective blood pressure, whereas dairy product consumption, excluding butter, is not detrimental to arterial stiffness and metabolic markers. Further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms that underpin these relationships.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Uncontrolled Keywords: dairy products;blood pressure;aortic pulse wave velocity;augmentation index;cardiovascular disease
Publisher: American Heart Association
ISSN: 0194-911X
Date of Acceptance: 5 October 2012
Last Modified: 28 Apr 2019 12:17
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/110240

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