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Pattern recognition receptors in fungal immunity

Patin, Emmanuel C., Thompson, Aiysha and Orr, Selinda J. 2019. Pattern recognition receptors in fungal immunity. Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology 89 , pp. 24-33. 10.1016/j.semcdb.2018.03.003

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Abstract

Over the last decade, invasive fungal infections have emerged as a growing threat to human health worldwide and novel treatment strategies are urgently needed. In this context, investigations into host-pathogen interactions represent an important and promising field of research. Antigen presenting cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells are strategically located at the frontline of defence against potential invaders. Importantly, these cells express germline encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which sense conserved entities from pathogens and orchestrate innate immune responses. Herein, we review the latest findings regarding the biology and functions of the different classes of PRRs involved in pathogenic fungal recognition. We also discuss recent literature on PRR collaboration/crosstalk and the mechanisms involved in inhibiting/regulating PRR signalling. Finally, we discuss how the accumulated knowledge on PRR biology, especially Dectin-1, has been used for the design of new immunotherapies against fungal infections.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 1084-9521
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 22 March 2018
Date of Acceptance: 5 March 2018
Last Modified: 27 Jun 2019 10:57
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/110095

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