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Impact of low-dose CT screening on smoking cessation among high-risk participants in the UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial

Brain, Kate, Carter, Ben, Lifford, Kate J., Burke, Olivia, Devaraj, Anand, Baldwin, David R., Duffy, Stephen and Field, John K. 2017. Impact of low-dose CT screening on smoking cessation among high-risk participants in the UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial. Thorax 72 (10) , pp. 912-918. 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2016-209690

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Abstract

Background Smoking cessation was examined among high-risk participants in the UK Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) Pilot Trial of low-dose CT screening. Methods High-risk individuals aged 50–75 years who completed baseline questionnaires were randomised to CT screening (intervention) or usual care (no screening control). Smoking habit was determined at baseline using self-report. Smokers were asked whether they had quit smoking since joining UKLS at T1 (2 weeks after baseline scan results or control assignment) and T2 (up to 2 years after recruitment). Intention-to-treat (ITT) regression analyses were undertaken, adjusting for baseline lung cancer distress, trial site and sociodemographic variables. Results Of a total 4055 individuals randomised to CT screening or control, 1546 were baseline smokers (759 intervention, 787 control). Smoking cessation rates were 8% (control n=36/479) versus 14% (intervention n=75/527) at T1 and 21% (control n=79/377) versus 24% (intervention n=115/488) at T2. ITT analyses indicated that the odds of quitting among screened participants were significantly higher at T1 (adjusted OR (aOR) 2.38, 95% CI 1.56 to 3.64, p<0.001) and T2 (aOR 1.60, 95% CI 1.17 to 2.18, p=0.003) compared with control. Intervention participants who needed additional clinical investigation were more likely to quit in the longer term compared with the control group (aOR 2.29, 95% CI 1.62 to 3.22, p=0.007) and those receiving a negative result (aOR 2.43, 95% CI 1.54 to 3.84, p<0.001). Conclusions CT lung cancer screening for high-risk participants presents a teachable moment for smoking cessation, especially among those who receive a positive scan result. Further behavioural research is needed to evaluate optimal strategies for integrating smoking cessation intervention with stratified lung cancer screening.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN: 0040-6376
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 20 July 2017
Date of Acceptance: 27 February 2017
Last Modified: 13 May 2020 14:30
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/102717

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