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In/visible conflicts: NGOs and the visual politics of humanitarian photography

Dencik, Lina and Allan, Stuart 2017. In/visible conflicts: NGOs and the visual politics of humanitarian photography. Media, Culture & Society 39 (8) , pp. 1178-1193. 10.1177/0163443717726865

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Abstract

This article examines the diverse factors shaping NGO involvement with humanitarian photography, paying particular attention to co-operative relationships with photojournalists intended to facilitate the generation of visual coverage of crises otherwise marginalised, or ignored altogether, in mainstream news media. The analysis is primarily based on a case study drawing upon 26 semi-structured interviews with NGO personnel (International Red Cross/Red Crescent Movement, Oxfam and Save the Children) and photojournalists conducted over 2014 to 2016, securing original insights into the epistemic terms upon which NGOs have sought to produce, frame and distribute imagery from recurrently disregarded crisis zones. In this way, the article pinpoints how the uses of digital imagery being negotiated by NGOs elucidate the changing, stratified geo-politics of visibility demarcating the visual boundaries of newsworthiness.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Journalism, Media and Culture
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General) > PN1990 Broadcasting
T Technology > TR Photography
Uncontrolled Keywords: NGOs, photojournalism, humanitarian photography, conflict, crisis, digital imagery, visual politics, distant suffering
Publisher: SAGE
ISSN: 0163-4437
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 7 June 2017
Date of Acceptance: 2 May 2017
Last Modified: 18 Feb 2018 21:02
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/101289

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