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The longitudinal association between external locus of control, social cognition and adolescent psychopathology

Sullivan, Sarah A., Thompson, Andy, Kounali, Daphne, Lewis, Glyn and Zammit, Stanley 2017. The longitudinal association between external locus of control, social cognition and adolescent psychopathology. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 52 (6) , pp. 643-655. 10.1007/s00127-017-1359-z
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Abstract

Purpose To investigate the longitudinal associations between social cognitive ability an external locus of control (externality) and adolescent psychopathology. Methods 7058 participants from a prospective population-based cohort provided data on externality, social communication, and emotion perception between 7 and 16 years and psychotic experiences and depressive symptoms at 12 and 18 years. Bivariate probit modelling was used to investigate associations between these risk factors and psychopathological outcomes. Results Externality was associated with psychopathology at 12 (psychotic experiences OR 1.23 95% CI 1.14, 1.33; depression OR 1.12 95% CI 1.02, 1.22) and 18 years (psychotic experiences OR 1.38 95% CI 1.23, 1.55; depression OR 1.40 95% CI 1.28, 1.52). Poor social communication was associated with depression at both ages (12 years OR 1.22 95% CI 1.11, 1.34; 18 years OR 1.21 95% CI 1.10, 1.33) and marginally associated with psychotic experiences. There was marginal evidence of a larger association between externality and psychotic experiences at 12 years (p = 0.06) and between social communication and depression at 12 years (p = 0.03). Conclusions Externality was more strongly associated with psychotic experiences. At 18 years change in externality, between 8 and 16 years were associated with a larger increase in the risk of depression. Poor social communication was more strongly associated with depression.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics
Uncontrolled Keywords: Psychotic experiences Depressive symptoms Social communication ALSPAC
Publisher: Springer Verlag
ISSN: 0933-7954
Last Modified: 02 Aug 2017 15:23
URI: http://orca-mwe.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/100136

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